Civil War in Loudoun Valley: The Battle of Unison, November 1-3, 1862

Unison NPS Study.jpg
Unison NPS Study.jpg

Civil War in Loudoun Valley: The Battle of Unison, November 1-3, 1862

25.00

The National Park Service history and mapping of the little known three-day Civil War Battle of Unison is published by the Unison Preservation Society.

The history, funded by a 2006 federal grant to the Unison nonprofit group from the U.S. Department of Interior, confirms that the 1862 battle around Unison was far more important than previously thought. 

The 52-page history of the battle is illustrated with color maps showing the details of the three-day battle, historical woodcuts and drawings, period and contemporary photographs and a copy of Lincoln’s letter to Maj. Gen. George McClellan laying out the strategy that led to the battle. Lincoln’s planned thrust through Loudoun County was designed to cut off General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia from its capital in Richmond and possibly hasten the end of the Civil War.

But a small Confederate force under Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart delayed the advance of the much larger Union Army for three days around Unison, foiling Lincoln’s plan and allowing the Confederate Army to escape the trap. Lincoln immediately removed the popular McClellan from command. It was a highly publicized and nationally controversial action, comparable to President Harry S. Truman’s removing the popular Gen. Douglas MacArthur from command in 1951 during the Korean War.

The mapping and history of the Nov. 1-3 Unison battle were done by National Park Service historian and cartographer David Lowe and funded by a $20,000 grant from Interior’s American Battlefield Protection Program (ABPP).

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